A Novel in 4 Days – Day #3 — The End!

Today is day three of my journey to finish my novel over 4 days this week. I blogged about my plan HERE (10K per day for 4 days to equal 40,000 words) and the results of Day #1 can be found HERE and Day #2 HERE.

On Day #2, I hadn’t hit my goal. I only wrote 8200 words with a goal of 10,000. I was approaching the book’s climax and I got stuck. A little case of writer’s block. I put the story away and talked through my road blocks with my husband and daughter. Between the three of us, we came up with a few ideas on how to twist the story around.

Then yesterday, I had to work at the zoo, so I took the day off from writing. A little recovery time. 🙂

This morning, I was full-force back into it. Cranking out nearly 6000 words today before I picked my kids up from school…but then the story all came together and I wrote two special little words:

The End.

It’s a short first draft, as when I throw down a lot of words in one day the result is like a skeleton. Mostly dialogue, no description, pretty bad writing.

But now the fun begins — editing! Fleshing out my first draft into an actual story I can send off to beta readers.

Honestly, that part takes the most time for me. It’s when the real writing gets done.

Ernest Hemingway had said, “The only kind of writing is rewriting.” Time and time again, I prove this to be true.

So, how many words have I written this week so far?

  • Day 1: 10,157 words
  • Day 2: 8,201 words
  • Day 3: 5,798 words
  • Total: 24,156 words (bringing my novel up to 48,319 words.)

And I know when I’m done editing, it’ll be at least 60,000 words…or a lot more. Even though I wrote “The End,” I’ll still post how the editing goes tomorrow.

My take-home thoughts:

  • I am completely capable of writing 10,000 words in a day! I was skeptical of this, and it’s a great confidence booster to know your capabilities. (But writing 5000 words is much more manageable for life-balance, as I learned today.)
  • A break between major writing days is helpful for plotting when you’re stuck and for the little things…like telling your family you love them.
  • To write this fast, you need to have your major plot points already created. If you get stuck, you come to a screeching halt.
  • I discovered that I work best off a rough outline of plot points, rather than a detailed outline.

So, what will I try with my next novel?

  • Pick four days per month to write 5000 words.
  • Edit on days in between, so there’s not this daunting task of fixing an entire novel at the end.
  • Just get the thing done. Once the plot is down on paper, publishing the novel is so much closer.

And that’s a wrap. Thanks for joining in and all the encouragement. It’s amazing how I can not meet my exact goals, yet feel so accomplished anyway.

How about you? Do you write a little each day or have big writing days where you compose thousands of words?

5 thoughts on “A Novel in 4 Days – Day #3 — The End!

  1. Good job on finishing the draft. Whether you do it at 10K a day, or whatever you can eke out over a lunch break, finishing that first draft is worth celebrating. I write what I can, when I can. The scenes sometimes take me by surprise, and sometimes I know what’s coming. I’ve known for months that a certain event was going to happen in my current WIP, but had no idea how it would pan out. Now I’m up against a wall because I need some know-how that I don’t have about weather reporting, so off to the drawing board (and message boards) to find someone to help me out.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Congratulations! That is so awesome that you got to The End in only three days. You should get yourself a box of Godiva chocolates or something to celebrate. 😀

    “Mostly dialogue, no description…” 😆 I know how that goes. I’ve written a couple of chapters in my current story where it’s very quick back and forth dialogue. When I reach the end of the chapter, I have to go back and add in all of the action beats (mainly to help keep track of who’s saying what).

    “I discovered that I work best off a rough outline of plot points, rather than a detailed outline.” Me too! I’ve never really tried to write from an outline. But I’ve found that as I write, I realize what needs to happen in the upcoming chapters and/or the end and it’s all a matter of writing towards those big moments.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: A Novel in 4 Days – Hold me Accountable! | Joynell Schultz

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s